Asthma: Expert urges early treatment to avoid complications

The Chief Medical Director (CMD), Triumphant Hospital Benin, Dr Peters Irobo,  has urged Nigerians with chronic cases of asthma to seek early treatment to avoid complications.

Irobo gave the advice in an interview in Benin on Monday.

He defined asthma as a condition whereby a person’s airways become inflamed, narrow, swollen and produce extra mucus which makes it difficult to breathe.

“Asthma symptoms can be controlled if the affected person avoids those things that trigger it but there is tendency it will reoccur if not tracked.

“Asthma symptoms vary from person to person and it often changes over time, its important that you work with your doctor to track your signs and symptoms and adjust treatment as needed.

“You may have infrequent asthma attacks, have symptoms only at certain times, such as when exercising, or have symptoms all the time,’’ Irobo said.

According to Irobo, asthma is a minor nuisance for some people, while for others it can be a major problem that interferes with daily activities and may lead to a life-threatening attack.

The physician listed symptoms of asthma to include shortness of breath, chest tightness or pain, trouble sleeping, usually caused by shortness of breath, coughing or wheezing.

Others are whistling or wheezing sound when exhaling (wheezing is a common sign of asthma in children), coughing or wheezing attacks that were worsened by a respiratory virus, such as a cold or flu.

He, however, said with the application of appropriate medical care, such as medicines, and inhalers among others, complications could be avoided.

Irobo said asthmatic patients should avoid situations that can trigger it, while urging them to ensure regular check up and treatment.

According to him, it is not clear why some people have asthma and others do not, but it is probably due to a combination of environmental and genetic (inherited) factors.

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