INEC should formulate new guidelines for political parties registration

By Yemi Falana– In the case of Independent National Electoral Commission v. Balarabe Musa (2003) 10 WRN 1, the Supreme Court upheld the fundamental right of Nigerian citizens to form or belong to political parties of their choice in accordance with Section 40 of the 1999 Constitution of the Republic. But the expansion of the democratic space was exploited by people of ill-motivated agenda who set up all kinds of political associations and proceeded to register them as political parties.

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Right of Reply to Pendulum: Dele Momodu’s Open Letter to the VP

One could have easily made up his mind not to read or respond to anything you wrote after seeing the rather unprincipled queuing up behind Senator Bukola Saraki and then abandoning him, moving on to former Vice President Atiku Abubakar, and then deserting him as well. But I felt one should respond to your attempts to create a false narrative from the very hollow lamentation of the recent elections as the “worst in our history”.

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A choice between progress and retreat – Tinubu

By Asiwaju Bola Tinubu– The future is uncertain until we enter it. February 16 is Election Day and on that day Nigeria shall step into its future. How you vote on that day will determine whether we walk into the future in a manner that guides our subsequent steps toward the national greatness that calls to us or will we walk into it backwards as if feebly trying to reinvent the past.

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Citizens’ power and access to information in Nigeria

By Femi Falana– Under section 22 of the 1999 Constitution the mass media is required to uphold the fundamental objectives of the State and uphold the responsibility and accountability of the government to the people. While the duty imposed on the media has been frustrated by the denial of access to information on public affairs it is submitted that access to information is a fundamental right by virtue of section 38 of the Constitution which stipulates that “every citizen shall have the right to freedom of expression including the right to obtain information and impart ideas”.

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Is Tanzania moving towards totalitarianism?

By Gbenga Sesan– Last Wednesday January 30, Tanzania moved decisively closer to becoming a one-party state when parliament approved proposed amendments to the Political Parties’ Act that was first passed in 1992. That was the year that the country adopted multi-party democracy, after 31 years of maintaining its one-party status that it nearly started with as an independent nation in 1961 and made official through a 1963 announcement by the then President, Julius Nyerere.

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