Christians suffer persecution in Nigeria more than anywhere in the world –COCIN President

WorldStage Newsonline— The President of Church of Christ In Nations (COCIN), Reverend Dachollom Datiri said Nigeria has been adjudged as a country where Christians suffer persecution more than anywhere in the world.

Datiri also cautioned that the Church in Nigeria is under siege and that the earlier action is taken to avert it, the better for Christians in the country.

The COCIN president was speaking at the gathering for the release of 15-year-old Leah Sharibu, from the hands of Boko Haram who abducted her alongside 110 others in Dapchi, Borno State, in February this year. Others were released. She was not because of her faith.

Rev. Datiri urged the federal government stop playing game with her life and step up efforts that would lead to her release.

“Leah Sharibu is now running into eight months in captivity in the hands of Boko Haram because of her faith in Christ and government under Buhari is playing games with her life. We make bold to say that no responsible government would allow this; even for one day,” he stated.

The Christian cleric also spoke on the forthcoming general election and warned that the church would not accept electoral robbery during the 2019 general election.

He advised the Federal Government to allow the will of the masses to prevail in 2019 by ensuring free, fair and credible election.

He said: “We call on the federal government to do everything needed to give Nigerians credible elections come 2019. We condemn the blatant broad day electoral robbery we have witnessed in some elections this year and call on politicians to embrace patriotic zeal and eschew any desperate craze for positions and power.

“We task all COCIN pastors and leaders to give spiritual leadership and guidance to our teaming members in the electoral process and to eschew getting entangled into partisan politics or allow themselves to be used by desperate politicians.”

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